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July 31 – August 3, 2017
The Penn Stater Conference Center Hotel
State College, Pennsylvania

Conference Archive 2013

NOTE: Documents uploaded on this page have not been modified and are in the format as received from the presenters.
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Monday, July 29

01. Opening Keynote: Autism Treatment: A Rich History and Promising Future
Bridget A. Taylor, Jodi DiPiazza

Twenty-six years ago, Ivar Lovaas published his landmark study documenting the benefits of early intensive behavioral intervention for autism. Together with a number of other seminal works, Lovaas' publication brought about a paradigm shift in the delivery of autism services, and impacted outcomes for an inestimable number of children affected by autism. As is inevitable, the field of applied behavior analysis and autism treatment has evolved in the years since, producing a wide array of applications and procedures to enhance increasingly complex skills of individuals with autism. At the core, however, the fundamental principles of behavior analysis endure. This presentation will assess the progressive arc of autism treatment, with an eye toward anticipating how the enduring fundamentals of applied behavior analysis provide not only a connection to an esteemed history, but a path forward into a promising future. 

03. An Introduction to the National Autism Conference and Applied Behavior Analysis
Mike Miklos

Mike Miklos will present a brief overview of evidence-based interventions for students with autism. Since most of that evidence suggests the importance of applied behavior analysis (ABA) in guiding interventions for individuals with autism, many sessions at the National Autism Conference focus on ABA. During this session, the basic principles of ABA will be presented for beginners and those who want a review of those principles. This session is appropriate for parents and educators. The content of this session will prepare attendees to get the most out of this year’s conference. Information presented will be supported by videos of ABA-based interventions. Additionally, the session will include a brief review of how data may be presented in the various ABA-based sessions occurring at the conference.

04. Selecting Function-Based Treatments for Socially Maintained Problem Behavior
James E. Carr

The field of applied behavior analysis has developed a number of methods for identifying the function of problem behavior. When the identified function is a social one (e.g., escape, attention, tangible), a number of empirically supported function-based treatments are potentially viable. For example, escape could be provided contingent upon an appropriate response (DRA), on a fixed time schedule (NCR), or not at all (EXT). Carr will review the procedures and evidence for several function-based treatments and will present decision-making models for selecting treatments for attention- and escape-maintained problem behaviors. These rubrics incorporate the most common barriers encountered in consultation and direct-service delivery, as well as client characteristics that might lead you to select one option over others. Participants will complete each rubric for a client of their own and should bring the relevant details of their case to the workshop, though these details will not be shared publicly.

05. Thirty Years of Research on the Functional Analysis of Problem Behavior: What Have We Learned?
Brian Iwata

This presentation will summarize major themes in research on the assessment of problem behavior, the current status of experimental analysis and alternative approaches, and implications for future work.

06. Bringing Science to the Community: Creating a New System of Heath Care for Infants and Toddlers with Autism
Ami Klin

This presentation highlights the critical role of early diagnosis and intervention in attenuating the symptoms of autism. Data will be presented on early diagnostic indicators obtained through eye-tracking-based behavioral assays that quantify the social disabilities in autism. The results of these assays were used to generate "growth charts" of normative social engagement, and the deviations from the norm were taken as early indicators of risk. These methods yielded high sensitivity and specificity for the screening of infants. The ultimate goal of this effort is to develop objectified and quantified tools for the detection of autism in infancy, tools that might be deployed in primary care and pediatricians' offices. Effective screening of infants would be unethical without a clinical infrastructure providing access to family support and early intervention for those screened positive. Through collaboration with Dr. Amy Wetherby, we are now establishing tools and procedures for the full integration of primary care physicians and early intervention providers, with the goal of establishing a new system of health care delivery for infants and toddlers with autism spectrum disorders.

07. Bench-to-Bedside: How Behavioral Momentum Theory Has and Is Informing Behavioral Interventions
F. Charles “Bud” Mace

This workshop will present NIH's Bench-to-Bedside initiative and relate it to contemporary advances in behavior analytic approaches to the treatment of behavior disorders. Translational research will be discussed and illustrated in basic and applied research on the variables that affect treatment relapse. The approach describes how basic non-human research has led to the development of human clinical models of treatment relapse and how this research has led to innovative developments in behavioral treatments that can avoid or reduce the magnitude of treatment relapse. The importance of coordinating basic and applied research is emphasized.

08. Context Matters: Implementing Evidence-Based Practices for Children with Autism in Public Schools
David Mandell

Many interventions for children with autism have been proven efficacious in university-based research settings, but rarely make their way into community practice. When they do, they rarely achieve the same outcomes as observed in research trials. The gap between research and community practice requires new ways of thinking about community-research partnerships and new strategies for intervention development and implementation. This presentation will discuss findings from a large randomized trial collaboratively conducted by the University of Pennsylvania and the school district of Philadelphia, and the development of strategies to increase the use of evidence-based practices for students with autism in public schools.

09. The Role of Joint Control in Behavior
David Palmer

Joint control is a concept with both applied and theoretical implications. It offers an explanation for matching, delayed matching, successful searching, and related behavioral phenomena.

10. Legal Issues for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Review and Update
Perry A. Zirkel

This session will focus on reviewing and updating the basic legal lessons presented at the last two conferences. The focus will include explaining the difference between the DSM-IV and IDEA classifications for Autism Spectrum Disorders, applying the principles of a free and appropriate public education (FAPE) to recent case scenarios, and evaluating the available avenues for legal resolution of cases involving students with autism spectrum disorders.

11. Recent Developments at the Behavior Analyst Certification Board
James E. Carr

The presentation will focus on recent developments at the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB). The most current data on the BCBA and BCaBA certification programs will be provided, including the overall number of certificants, the number of approved university training options, and recent examination pass rates. In addition, a number of recent and impending developments at the BACB will be described, including ongoing efforts to raise standards, changes to supervision rules, the dissemination of practice guidelines, and the development of a credential for behavioral technicians.

Tuesday, July 30

12. Thirty Points about Motivation from Skinner's Book Verbal Behavior and Their Implications for Autism Interventions
Mark L. Sundberg

B.F. Skinner discussed the topic of motivation in every chapter of the book Verbal Behavior (1957), usually with his preferred terminology of deprivation, satiation, and aversive stimulation. Direct quotations will be used to systematically take the participant through 30 separate points made by Skinner that collectively provide a comprehensive analysis of the role of motivation in behavior analysis. In addition, various refinements and extensions of Skinner's analysis by Jack Michael and colleagues (e.g., Laraway, et al., 2003; Michael, 1982, 2007) will be incorporated. Several applications of Skinner's analysis to assessment and intervention programs for children with autism will be suggested.

13. Adaptive Behavior and Autism Spectrum Disorders: Notes from the Forgotten Frontier
Peter Gerhardt

Adaptive behavior is defined as those skills or abilities that enable the individual to meet standards of personal independence and responsibility that would be expected of his or her age and social group. But despite the fact that adult outcomes can, in no small part, be seen as a function of adaptive behavior, very little clinical or research attention is paid to this critically important cohort of skills. This may be due to adaptive behavior deficits not being considered as part of the triad of diagnostic characteristics (e.g., communication, social competencies, idiosyncratic behavior) in autism. This workshop will provide an overview of current research on adaptive behavior and discuss implications for both classroom and community-based instruction.

14. Preference Assessments for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders
Iser DeLeon

This presentation addresses preference assessments, validation of those assessments, and how to arrange effective reinforcement contingencies for persons with autism spectrum disorders.

15. Early Intervention for Young Children with Autism
Kathleen Quill

Autism and its treatment are controversial and complex. While some professionals suggest simple solutions, history has shown us that the heterogeneous nature of autism spectrum disorder demands complex intervention that interfaces medical, developmental, behavioral, and social services for children and families. This session will highlight a multidisciplinary model of intervention for young children with autism.

16. Charting a Course of Functional Skills: Essential for Living and the Essential 8
Patrick McGreevy

Dr. McGreevy will describe the components of Essential for Living, a new communication, behavior, and functional skills assessment, curriculum, and skill tracking instrument for children and adults with moderate-to-severe disabilities, including autism. Two components will receive special attention: 1) selecting a method of speaking for non-verbal learners, and 2) managing problems in the context of teaching the Essential 8 Skills.

18. Bureau of Autism Services Updates: Meeting the Needs of Individuals with Autism through Collaboration and Appropriate Supports
Lindsay Lawer, Nina Wall-Coté

During this session, the Bureau of Autism Services (BAS) and Pennsylvania Autism Service, Education, Resources, and Training (ASERT) representatives will share exciting information about key initiatives, including updated Pennsylvania autism census data; the ASERT Collaborative initiatives, including the 2013 launch of the Statewide Resource Center and website; and current information about the Adult Autism Waiver and Adult Community Autism Program (ACAP). BAS presenters will also share additional resources and collaborative efforts underway to help individuals with autism improve their quality of life, achieve independence, and become contributing members of their communities.

19. The Role and Importance of Fluency for Students with Autism
Donna Salkin, Tina Lawson

This interactive workshop will address participation as a first step in engaging students in the stages of learning. The focus will be on moving skills from acquisition to fluency to ensure generalization and stability of skills. Participants will be introduced to the concept of learning channels to address multiple means of instructional delivery.

20. Supporting Participation: Inclusive Early Intervention for Young Children with Autism
Susan Zeiders, Heidi Wettlaufer, Andrea Morris, Kimberly J. Herb

Principles of inclusion will be discussed and applied, with a focus on young children with autism regardless of "educational placement." This session will emphasize the importance of early interventionists supporting young children with autism in their everyday lives across a variety of settings. Strategies for supporting optimal participation in daily routines and activities, as well as ideas for facilitating play and interaction with typically developing peers, will be shared. Finally, resources for early childhood and family caregivers will be identified.

21. The Role of Joint Control in Behavior (repeat)
David Palmer

Joint control is a concept with both applied and theoretical implications. It offers an explanation for matching, delayed matching, successful searching, and related behavioral phenomena.

22. A Diagnosis of Autism…Now What?
Roxann Barnett

This session will provide information about the important first steps parents can take after receiving an autism diagnosis for a child. The presentation will cover interventions, services, and resources found in home communities and statewide that are available to offer assistance to individuals and families with children with autism spectrum disorders.

23. An Introduction to and Administration of the VB-MAPP
Heather Thompson

The Verbal Behavior Milestones Assessment and Placement Program (VB-MAPP, Sundberg, 2008), created by Dr. Mark Sundberg, is a behavioral language assessment grounded in the principles of behavior analysis and Skinner's analysis of verbal behavior. The goal of the VB-MAPP assessment is to provide a baseline of a child's skills and a simple comparison to typically developing peers. Since the assessment involves a behavioral unit of analysis (that is form and function of language properties in an antecedent-behavior-consequence analysis), this precludes a need for a basic understanding of such analysis by any conductor of the assessment. This presentation will focus on providing such analysis as well as a general overview of the components of the VB-MAPP, milestone areas, administration guidelines, scoring guidelines, and data collection tools to allow for fidelity of assessment and scoring.

24. Thirty Points about Motivation from Skinner's Book Verbal Behavior and Their Implications for Autism Interventions (repeat)
Mark L. Sundberg

B.F. Skinner discussed the topic of motivation in every chapter of the book Verbal Behavior (1957), usually with his preferred terminology of deprivation, satiation, and aversive stimulation. Direct quotations will be used to systematically take the participant through 30 separate points made by Skinner that collectively provide a comprehensive analysis of the role of motivation in behavior analysis. In addition, various refinements and extensions of Skinner's analysis by Jack Michael and colleagues (e.g., Laraway, et al., 2003; Michael, 1982, 2007) will be incorporated. Several applications of Skinner's analysis to assessment and intervention programs for children with autism will be suggested.

25. Adaptive Behavior and Autism Spectrum Disorders: Notes from the Forgotten Frontier (repeat)
Peter Gerhardt

Adaptive behavior is defined as those skills or abilities that enable the individual to meet standards of personal independence and responsibility that would be expected of his or her age and social group. But despite the fact that adult outcomes can, in no small part, be seen as a function of adaptive behavior, very little clinical or research attention is paid to this critically important cohort of skills. This may be due to adaptive behavior deficits not being considered as part of the triad of diagnostic characteristics (e.g., communication, social competencies, idiosyncratic behavior) in autism. This workshop will provide an overview of current research on adaptive behavior and discuss implications for both classroom and community-based instruction.

26. Preference Assessments for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (repeat)
Iser DeLeon

This presentation addresses preference assessments, validation of those assessments, and how to arrange effective reinforcement contingencies for persons with autism spectrum disorders.

27. Early Intervention for Young Children with Autism (repeat)
Kathleen Quill

Autism and its treatment are controversial and complex. While some professionals suggest simple solutions, history has shown us that the heterogeneous nature of autism spectrum disorder demands complex intervention that interfaces medical, developmental, behavioral, and social services for children and families. This session will highlight a multidisciplinary model of intervention for young children with autism.

28. Charting a Course of Functional Skills: Essential for Living and the Essential 8 (repeat)
Patrick McGreevy

Dr. McGreevy will describe the components of Essential for Living, a new communication, behavior, and functional skills assessment, curriculum, and skill tracking instrument for children and adults with moderate-to-severe disabilities, including autism. Two components will receive special attention: 1) selecting a method of speaking for non-verbal learners, and 2) managing problems in the context of teaching the Essential 8 Skills

30. Setting the Stage for Social Success: Acting Antics
Cindy Schneider

This is a workshop in which participants will be very actively engaged. We will briefly review the social needs of young children, students, and adults diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders. Participants can learn strategies and techniques through active participation in theater games and activities that specifically address those social issues. Group discussion about skills and adaption will follow each activity.

31. An Examination of the Use of Technology in Autism Support Classrooms
Liz Maher

This session will examine the various ways to use technology in autism support classrooms: as a means to reinforce students, as an augmentative communication device, as a data collection tool, as an organizational tool for staff and students, as a way to supplement instruction, and as a training tool. Different examples of commercial hardware and software will be discussed, including their pros and cons in the special education field.

32. Teaching Signs and Sign Language to Hearing Students with Developmental Disabilities Including Autism
Carl T. Sundberg

This workshop will focus on teaching sign language to children and adults with autism (and other developmental disabilities). The participants will learn the difference between the two primary types of response forms: topography-based (e.g., sign language) and selection-based (e.g., picture exchange). Advantages and disadvantages of each will be discussed. The participants will learn how to teach signs as a primary response form, and understand the main reasons sign language programs fail and how to avoid these pitfalls.

33. Teaching Your Child with Autism to Comply
Rachel Kittenbrink

This session will focus on building a repertoire of strategies that parents, caregivers, and professionals can use to increase compliance and direction following behaviors in children and young adults. Topics covered will include setting up situations for success, effective use of reinforcement, teaching compliance through sequenced practice, and the use of promise reinforcers.

34. The Basics of Mand Training
Willow Hozella, Miguel Ampuero

Social initiation and communication deficits are hallmarks of autism. Mand training provides a method to teach children to ask for what they want and to initiate interactions with others. This session will cover the basic principles and procedures of teaching children to make requests. It will include techniques to establish motivation, to teach children to approach other people, and to develop a broad range of effective requesting behaviors.

35. Programming Based on the Analysis of Verbal Behavior
Amiris DiPuglia

Successful programming is dependent upon accurate assessment and an analysis that leads to a selection of skill areas to address that are at the right instructional level, appropriate sequence of instruction, clear teaching procedures, and data systems to monitor progress. This session will provide participants with guidelines on analyzing and deriving instructional programs from the Verbal Behavior Milestones Assessment and Placement Program (VB-MAPP, Sundberg, 2008). It will also provide guidelines and considerations for common instructional programs for all levels as well as a brief review of initial set-up of instructional materials and data systems to monitor progress. Attendees for this session should have a basic conceptual knowledge of applied behavior analysis, the verbal operants, and administration of the VB-MAPP or should have attended the morning session #23.

36. Special Presentation: Explaining the New DSM-5 Criteria for Autism Spectrum Disorders
Marisela Huerta

Conference participants will gain an understanding of the research that informed the changes to the American Psychiatric Association’s (APA) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM). The literature and current research on autism spectrum disorder diagnosis and classification will be reviewed alongside implications for clinical practice.

Wednesday, July 31

37. The Role of the Reflexive Conditioned Motivating Operations (CMO-R) in Teaching Children with Autism
Vincent J. Carbone

The principle of motivation has resurfaced as an independent variable in the field of behavior analysis over the past 20 years. The increased interest is the result of the refinements of the concept of the motivating operation (Michael, 1993) and its application to the learning needs of persons with autism and developmental disabilities. This presentation will provide an overview of antecedent-based instructional modifications to reduce escape and avoidance behavior by reducing the value of the conditioned motivating operation-reflexive (CMO-R). A conceptually systematic analysis of the influence of instructional methods is offered as a tool for improving the selection and implementation of effective teaching procedures. Video illustrations of application of the concepts will be provided.

38. Mand Training for Individuals with Autism: A Review of the Literature and Some Recommendations for Practice
Sarah Lechago

Mands are recommended as one of the initial targets in an early and intensive behavioral intervention (EIBI) program due to the benefits it offers the speaker (Sundberg and Michael, 2002). Mands for information may contribute to the expansion of verbal repertoires, efficient navigation of the speaker's environment, and are critical to social and academic success. Therefore, it is important to employ effective, research-supported methods to teach mands. This presentation will focus on the research literature on teaching basic mands (mands for items and activities) and mands for information, and on procedures related to teaching mands to individuals diagnosed with autism. We will review the most current research literature on teaching mands for information. A brief description of the motivating operation (MO) will be presented, and its role in teaching mands will be highlighted. Attendees will practice developing teaching procedures to teach basic mands and mands for information with special consideration to contriving the relevant MO and to integrating multiple teaching opportunities throughout the day.

39. Antecedent Interventions and Considerations to Reduce Significant Problem Behavior
Timothy Vollmer

This presentation will cover two general antecedent strategies: noncontingent reinforcement and prompting. Noncontingent reinforcement can be used as an intervention component when immediate reductions in problem behavior are needed. Traditional prompting strategies in applied behavior analysis will be revisited in light of recent findings.

40. Ethics and Professional Behavior
Jon Bailey

Deliberate and often automatic ethical conduct is required for professional behavior analysts, on a daily basis, for us to provide the highest quality service to our clients. Simply understanding the ethics code is not sufficient; it is necessary to translate the guidelines, on a moment's notice, into action that will protect the client, the behavior analyst, and the profession from harm. In this presentation, Jon Bailey will describe scenarios that can ethically challenge behavior analysts and suggest professional skills that are also required for us to maintain the utmost integrity of our rapidly growing field.

41. Contriving Transitive Conditioned Motivating Operations (CMO-T) to Establish Manding Skills
Ruth Anne Rehfeldt

This presentation will provide an overview of research conducted to date on the transitive conditioned motivating operation and its role in expanding mand repertoires. The presentation will provide a variety of examples of approaches that can be used to contrive transitive conditioned motivating operations, and will delineate how the presenter has done so in studies building mand repertoires using manual signs and the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS). We will also explore how the stimulus equivalence instructional framework can be used in conjunction with contriving transitive conditioned motivating operations to produce derived mand repertoires.

42. Teaching Procedures to Improve Vocal Responding
Barbara Esch

This session will cover assessment of speech skills and target selection. Articulation improvement procedures within echoic and echoic-to-mand contexts will be presented.

43. Teaching Social Sexual Safety Skills to Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders
Barbara T. Doyle

Children and adults with autism spectrum disorders need knowledge and skills in order to be safe, including social, sexual, safety skills. But what should we teach? And how should we teach? What have we learned from the social or sexual experiences of people with developmental disabilities? Barbara Doyle will answer these questions, bringing her knowledge of how children and adults with autism spectrum disorders think and learn, to help participants acquire strategies for teaching and learning important skills for social and sexual safety across the lifespan. Useful resources and handouts for assessment and goal selection will be provided.

44. Developing Programs for Young Learners Diagnosed with Autism
Ivy Chong

This presentation will address behavioral-based intervention procedures and programs addressing symptoms associated with autism spectrum disorders, including communication delays, aberrant behaviors, and general teaching strategies. A summary of program and curriculum development will also be provided and practiced.

45. Teaching Intraverbals: The Difference Between "Rote" and "Meaningful"
Anna Petursdottir

This presentation will focus on the relationship between intraverbal behavior and other verbal relations. A distinction will be made between intraverbal responses that might be considered "rote" and those that might be considered "meaningful." Recent research in this area will be reviewed and implications for practice will be discussed.

46. A Summary of the Effectiveness of Treatments for Pediatric Feeding Disorders
Cathleen Piazza

Previous research has demonstrated that escape extinction (EE) is a necessary component of treatment for pediatric feeding disorders in most cases (e.g., Ahearn, Kerwin, Eicher, Shantz, & Swearingin, 1996; Patel, Piazza, Martinez, Volkert, & Santana, 2001; Reed, Piazza, Patel, Layer, Bachmeyer, Bethke, & Gutshall, 2004). Our clinical experience is that EE is not always effective when used alone, which necessitates the use of alternative and/or additional procedures. Although researchers have evaluated the effectiveness of treatment procedures individually, the overall effectiveness of these procedures has not been evaluated on a large scale. In the present paper, we examined 135 data sets from children referred for treatment of a pediatric feeding disorder. We analyzed how often EE-based procedures were effective in increasing acceptance and mouth clean (a product measure of swallowing) and decreasing inappropriate mealtime behavior. We also analyzed how often it was necessary to use alternative and/or additional procedures when EE was not effective. We identified the procedures that were used and evaluated their effectiveness in treating the target behaviors noted above.

47. Instruction Basics for Children with Autism
Laura Yates

This session will provide a review of various strategies and procedures for the delivery of high-quality instruction. The focus will be on evidence-based interventions that include addressing the core issues of autism spectrum disorders, namely communication and social skills. The importance of instruction as a team effort that involves systematic training, data-guided decision making, and team communication will be emphasized.

49. The Role of the Reflexive Conditioned Motivating Operations (CMO-R) in Teaching Children with Autism (repeat)
Vincent J. Carbone

The principle of motivation has resurfaced as an independent variable in the field of behavior analysis over the past 20 years. The increased interest is the result of the refinements of the concept of the motivating operation (Michael, 1993) and its application to the learning needs of persons with autism and developmental disabilities. This presentation will provide an overview of antecedent-based instructional modifications to reduce escape and avoidance behavior by reducing the value of the conditioned motivating operation-reflexive (CMO-R). A conceptually systematic analysis of the influence of instructional methods is offered as a tool for improving the selection and implementation of effective teaching procedures. Video illustrations of application of the concepts will be provided.

50. Mand Training for Individuals with Autism: A Review of the Literature and Some Recommendations for Practice (repeat)
Sarah Lechago

Mands are recommended as one of the initial targets in an early and intensive behavioral intervention (EIBI) program due to the benefits it offers the speaker (Sundberg and Michael, 2002). Mands for information may contribute to the expansion of verbal repertoires, efficient navigation of the speaker's environment, and are critical to social and academic success. Therefore, it is important to employ effective, research-supported methods to teach mands. This presentation will focus on the research literature on teaching basic mands (mands for items and activities) and mands for information, and on procedures related to teaching mands to individuals diagnosed with autism. We will review the most current research literature on teaching mands for information. A brief description of the motivating operation (MO) will be presented, and its role in teaching mands will be highlighted. Attendees will practice developing teaching procedures to teach basic mands and mands for information with special consideration to contriving the relevant MO and to integrating multiple teaching opportunities throughout the day.

51. Antecedent Interventions and Considerations to Reduce Significant Problem Behavior (repeat)
Timothy Vollmer

This presentation will cover two general antecedent strategies: noncontingent reinforcement and prompting. Noncontingent reinforcement can be used as an intervention component when immediate reductions in problem behavior are needed. Traditional prompting strategies in applied behavior analysis will be revisited in light of recent findings.

52. Ethics and Professional Behavior (repeat)
Jon Bailey

Deliberate and often automatic ethical conduct is required for professional behavior analysts, on a daily basis, for us to provide the highest quality service to our clients. Simply understanding the ethics code is not sufficient; it is necessary to translate the guidelines, on a moment's notice, into action that will protect the client, the behavior analyst, and the profession from harm. In this presentation, Jon Bailey will describe scenarios that can ethically challenge behavior analysts and suggest professional skills that are also required for us to maintain the utmost integrity of our rapidly growing field.

53. Contriving Transitive Conditioned Motivating Operations (CMO-T) to Establish Manding Skills (repeat)
Ruth Anne Rehfeldt

This presentation will provide an overview of research conducted to date on the transitive conditioned motivating operation and its role in expanding mand repertoires. The presentation will provide a variety of examples of approaches that can be used to contrive transitive conditioned motivating operations, and will delineate how the presenter has done so in studies building mand repertoires using manual signs and the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS). We will also explore how the stimulus equivalence instructional framework can be used in conjunction with contriving transitive conditioned motivating operations to produce derived mand repertoires.

54. Teaching Procedures to Improve Vocal Responding (repeat)
Barbara Esch

This session will cover assessment of speech skills and target selection. Articulation improvement procedures within echoic and echoic-to-mand contexts will be presented.

55. Preparing for Success in the Workplace for People with Autism Spectrum Disorders
Barbara T. Doyle

People with autism CAN be successful in the workplace if they know and use the skills that the workplace requires. This presentation identifies needed skills and discusses how and when to teach them, and how to involve schools, families, and communities. Participants will learn how some school-based rules and goals can become counterproductive in the workplace and other postsecondary settings. Referencing real-life examples, Ms. Doyle will offer practical, ready-to-implement transition planning strategies and provide useful "take-away" materials.

56. Developing Programs for Young Learners Diagnosed with Autism (repeat)
Ivy Chong

This presentation will address behavioral-based intervention procedures and programs addressing symptoms associated with autism spectrum disorders, including communication delays, aberrant behaviors, and general teaching strategies. A summary of program and curriculum development will also be provided and practiced.

57. Teaching Intraverbals: The Difference Between "Rote" and "Meaningful" (repeat)
Anna Petursdottir

This presentation will focus on the relationship between intraverbal behavior and other verbal relations. A distinction will be made between intraverbal responses that might be considered "rote" and those that might be considered "meaningful." Recent research in this area will be reviewed and implications for practice will be discussed.

58. Understanding and Treating Sleep Problems of Children with Autism and Related Disabilities
Gregory P. Hanley

The goal of this seminar is to provide attendees with a sound understanding of factors that worsen and improve children's ability to achieve age-appropriate amounts of sleep as well as strategies for addressing common sleep problems such as difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep, nighttime routine noncompliance, and night terrors. As a result, attendees will have a better understanding of how family members and support staff can work as a team to promote the healthy sleep of the children in their care.

59. Behavior Basics for Children with Autism
Leigh M. O'Brien

This session will cover basic information related to identifying maladaptive behaviors and how behavior analysis can be utilized; focus on appropriate plans for techniques to prevent maladaptive behavior from occurring and how to manage maladaptive behavior when it does occur; teach identification of potential functions of behavior and how to develop a program based on antecedents and manipulation of consequences; and how to collect data to closely monitor behavior trends and effectiveness of current treatment.

60. Autism Support at the High School Level: Integrating Communication Instruction, Transition Planning, and Life Skills
Linda Franchock, Jaime Baker, Travis Young

This session will be led by a high school autistic support team. The team will provide participants with an overview of the high school classroom and will outline how to develop and implement meaningful programming for older learners. The objective of the session will be to share evidence-based procedures that can guide teachers in determining skills to teach, selecting teaching methods, developing progress monitoring systems, conducting staff training, and facilitating teacher collaboration of educational programs.

Thursday, August 1

62. Instructional Pacing and Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders
Matt Tincani

Time is a critical yet neglected dimension of instructional effectiveness. The purpose of this presentation is to provide an overview of instructional pacing and its applications for students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The presenter will define instructional pacing, including key elements such as wait-time and inter-trial-interval; summarize research on instructional pacing for students with autism spectrum disorders and other disabilities; and outline recommendations for practitioners drawn from pacing research, including ways to implement brisk instructional pacing to increase learning and prevent challenging behavior.

63. Teaching Students with Autism How To Read Using Direct Instruction
Faith Fisher

The presentation will utilize Reading Mastery Level K, the Signature Edition as the instructional program. This session will explore the techniques in the delivery of a lesson. The participants will learn and practice the effective teaching strategies that work particularly well with children with autism.

64. Protocols for Teaching Responding by Feature, Function, or Class (FFC) Across the Operants
Kristin M. Albert

This presentation will describe protocols for teaching the following language skills within the context of discrete trial instruction (DTI): listener responding, tact, and intraverbal by feature, function, or class (LRFFC, TFFC, and IFFC). Video demonstrations will be provided.

65. Motivating Operations and Discriminative Stimuli Have Last Names: Implications for the Assessment and Treatment of Challenging Behavior
Jose Martinez-Diaz

Most of us refer to motivating operations (MOs) and discriminative stimuli (SDs) by a shortened version of their name. This is what Dr. Martinez-Diaz calls their "first name." However, this common practice can be misleading and lead to errors in assessment, case formulation, and intervention planning. Dr. Martinez-Diaz will present a comprehensive scheme that provides both first and last names to MOs and SDs. The "last name" of an antecedent ties the antecedent to the consequence that is part of a specific contingency, as antecedents never function independently of consequences and are always part of an operant contingency. The presenter's scheme provides a more comprehensive approach than the present classification of behavioral functions used in current ABA practice. Dr. Martinez-Diaz will illustrate through case examples how ABA practitioners can use this scheme to conduct functional assessments and develop intervention plans for challenging behavior.

66. Social Skills for Higher Functioning Children
Katrina Mellott

This session will examine ways to teach social skills to higher functioning learners. Peer-to-peer manding, motivation, and skills-streaming curricula will be reviewed.

67. Parent Engagement in the Individualized Education Program Process
Jane Brown, Diane Funsten, Kim Jenkins

Parents are very important participants in the special education process. This session will provide an opportunity for parents and school personnel to review the current timelines, procedures, and forms related to the current special education process in Pennsylvania, from evaluation through IEP development and implementation. The importance of parent engagement in the IEP process will be emphasized. Techniques to enhance parent participation will be discussed. Resources to supplement session content will be provided.

69. Skill Sequences and Strategies in Training Motor Skills
Amy McGinnis

This workshop will present sequences for teaching a variety motor skills, based upon both developmental norms and the functionality and relevance of each skill. Evidence-based teaching procedures will be demonstrated and relevant empirical literature will be highlighted.

70. Assessment and Treatment of Incontinence with Emphasis on Delayed Toilet Training, Enuresis, and Encopresis
Patrick C. Friman

This presentation will cover incomplete toilet training, functional encopresis, and diurnal and nocturnal enuresis. The presentation will cover diagnosis and classification, assessment, relevant physiology, etiology, and effective treatment. The role of the behavior analyst will be emphasized, particularly in the areas of assessment and treatment.

71. Autism Support Classroom Setup 101
Katie Arentz

Implementation of evidence-based practices, in relation to applied behavior analytic–based interventions for students with autism, requires teachers to have the skills that allow for effective management and organization of their classroom environment, instructional materials, data-collection tools that make the data-collection process efficient and allow for data-based decision making, and time allocation for instruction. This training will provide participants with the information and specific tools necessary to organize their classroom in a manner that will ease the process of implementation to optimize student achievement.

72. Home Programming for Your Child
Amiris DiPuglia

Meaningful parent involvement is directly correlated with better student outcomes. This session will provide parents, educators, and behavioral health and community providers with guidelines, recommendations, and resources for effective home programming. The session will benefit those who are interested in starting a home program, as well as those who are looking to find ways to enhance their child's learning during everyday home and community activities. The session will also provide resources for effective home-school collaboration that have a direct impact on skill acquisition and progress.

73. Toilet Training in School
Jen Shade

Successful techniques for toilet training students with autism and other disabilities in a public school setting will be discussed. Protocols, data collection, and case study data from five students will be shared. This session will provide practical guidance that is applicable to the school setting. This inspiring presenter will also discuss collaboration with parents and the school's role in supporting the toilet training process at home. This session will be beneficial for school personal, consultants, and parents.

75. The Progression of Instruction for Natural Environment Teaching
Lisa McDonnell, Leigh M. O'Brien

Natural Environment Teaching (NET) involves systematic instruction of skills in situations that are representative of activities that occur as part of a student's day-to-day schedule. The NET process described in this session was developed and implemented in a middle school classroom by an amazing first-year teacher! This session will highlight implementation procedures for transferring skills taught during intensive teaching sessions to ongoing class activities. Examples of how new skills can be taught during NET activities will be provided. The procedural system used during NET instruction, as well as data systems documenting progress, will be presented.

76. Teaching Social Skills Using Peer-to-Peer Manding
Maureen Archer, Tom Miller, Rachel Kittenbrink

This session will include a description of peer-to-peer manding as well as the goals of this procedure. Classroom implementation will be the primary focus and will describe prerequisite skills for learner participation, implementation of peer-to-peer pairing for more naive learners, choosing peer pairs, data collection systems, the importance of preference assessments, session set-up, and reinforcement for manding/giving items and when to fade adult reinforcement. Possible pitfalls of implementation, such as preventing sessions from looking "contrived," over-prompting by adults and students, and prompting other students, will be discussed. A presentation of student data and session videos will be included, pending parental consent.

78. We're All in This Together: Effective Student-Centered Teaming
Lauren Knudson, Stacey Johnson, Kim Kupfer

Presenters for this session will focus on elements of effective teamwork necessary for consistency throughout students' integrated environments of home, school, and community. The presenters are a dedicated, motivated, and energetic team from a new classroom that supports students with autism support needs during the 2012–€“13 school year. Emphasis will be placed on collaboration, communication, consistency of implementation, and training components.

79. Puberty, Sexuality, Relationships, and Autism
Nancy Nowell

Adolescents and adults who have autism spectrum disorders want love and intimacy in their life just like anyone else. Hormones can have a larger impact on teens that are on the spectrum than other adolescents. Specific suggestions that can help teens and their families adjust to puberty and the new social sexual world of middle and high school will be provided. Preparing adolescents for the physical and emotional changes of puberty is important. Mood swings, depression, and increased anxiety are common. Learning skills that range from good hygiene, independence in the bathroom, age-appropriate clothes, makeup, menstruation, wet dreams, to private masturbation are necessary for a smooth transition to adulthood. Dealing with situations as they occur can also be complex. Common issues will be discussed including not understanding what is happening to their bodies, social-sexual boundaries, LBGBT information, touching, stalking, consent, the risk of sexual abuse, illegal sexual behavior, pornography, sexting, birth control, sexually transmitted diseases, pregnancy, communication, and intimacy.

80. Meaningful Inclusion
Keeli Dickmyer, Heather Stokes

Meaningful inclusion supports the premise that all children should be educated in the least restrictive environment and have access to the general education. Accomplishing this involves careful attention to meaningful instruction as well as overcoming social barriers. This session, presented by two master teachers in autism support classrooms, will highlight processes that allow students to be part of their school community and receive meaningful and appropriate instruction.

85. Toilet Training in School
Jen Shade

Successful techniques for toilet training students with autism and other disabilities in a public school setting will be discussed. Protocols, data collection, and case study data from five students will be shared. This session will provide practical guidance that is applicable to the school setting. This inspiring presenter will also discuss collaboration with parents and the school's role in supporting the toilet training process at home. This session will be beneficial for school personal, consultants, and parents.

87. The Progression of Instruction for Natural Environment Teaching
Lisa McDonnell, Leigh M. O'Brien

Natural Environment Teaching (NET) involves systematic instruction of skills in situations that are representative of activities that occur as part of a student's day-to-day schedule. The NET process described in this session was developed and implemented in a middle school classroom by an amazing first-year teacher! This session will highlight implementation procedures for transferring skills taught during intensive teaching sessions to ongoing class activities. Examples of how new skills can be taught during NET activities will be provided. The procedural system used during NET instruction, as well as data systems documenting progress, will be presented.

88. Teaching Social Skills Using Peer-to-Peer Manding
Maureen Archer, Tom Miller, Rachel Kittenbrink

This session will include a description of peer-to-peer manding as well as the goals of this procedure. Classroom implementation will be the primary focus and will describe prerequisite skills for learner participation, implementation of peer-to-peer pairing for more naive learners, choosing peer pairs, data collection systems, the importance of preference assessments, session set-up, and reinforcement for manding/giving items and when to fade adult reinforcement. Possible pitfalls of implementation, such as preventing sessions from looking "contrived," over-prompting by adults and students, and prompting other students, will be discussed. A presentation of student data and session videos will be included, pending parental consent.

90. We're All in This Together: Effective Student-Centered Teaming
Lauren Knudson, Stacey Johnson, Kim Kupfer

Presenters for this session will focus on elements of effective teamwork necessary for consistency throughout students' integrated environments of home, school, and community. The presenters are a dedicated, motivated, and energetic team from a new classroom supporting students with autism support needs during the 2012–13 school year. Emphasis will be placed on collaboration, communication, consistency of implementation, and training components.

91. Puberty, Sexuality, Relationships, and Autism
Nancy Nowell

Adolescents and adults who have autism spectrum disorders want love and intimacy in their life just like anyone else. Hormones can have a larger impact on teens that are on the spectrum than other adolescents. Specific suggestions that can help teens and their families adjust to puberty and the new social sexual world of middle and high school will be provided. Preparing adolescents for the physical and emotional changes of puberty is important. Mood swings, depression, and increased anxiety are common. Learning skills that range from good hygiene, independence in the bathroom, age-appropriate clothes, makeup, menstruation, wet dreams, to private masturbation are necessary for a smooth transition to adulthood. Dealing with situations as they occur can also be complex. Common issues will be discussed including not understanding what is happening to their bodies, social-sexual boundaries, LBGBT information, touching, stalking, consent, the risk of sexual abuse, illegal sexual behavior, pornography, sexting, birth control, sexually transmitted diseases, pregnancy, communication, and intimacy.

92. Meaningful Inclusion
Keeli Dickmyer, Heather Stokes

Meaningful inclusion supports the premise that all children should be educated in the least restrictive environment and have access to the general education. Accomplishing this involves careful attention to meaningful instruction as well as overcoming social barriers. This session, presented by two master teachers in autism support classrooms, will highlight processes that allow students to be part of their school community and receive meaningful and appropriate instruction.

96. Closing Keynote: Through a Lion's Eye: Our Family's Journey with Autism
Ana Warner, Curt Warner

This closing keynote will feature a past Nittany Lion's personal story of a life touched by autism.